Popular Fashion Brands To Eliminate Toxic Supstances By 2020

Greenpeace has announced that it welcomes the new ‘Joint Roadmap’ published by international clothing companies Adidas, H&M, Nike and Puma, as an important step towards the elimination of all releases of hazardous substances from the brands’ supply chains and products by 2020. Greenpeace also welcomed moves by fast-fashion retailer C&A and Chinese sportswear brand Li-Ning, whose individual ‘Detox’ commitments allowed for their credible participation in the Roadmap. “Now that fashion leaders have sketched out their designs for a toxic-free future, they need to transform these into ready-to-wear collections that will bring about large-scale change in the fashion sector,” commented Martin Hojsik, Detox Campaign Coordinator at Greenpeace International.

The Joint Roadmap outlines how the companies will deliver against their ‘Detox’ commitments and includes details on the development of tools to monitor the release of hazardous chemicals, green chemistry initiatives and pilot projects for the elimination of certain chemicals. However, Greenpeace is challenging all of the companies to respond with more urgency to the problem of toxic water pollution, by publishing shorter and more concrete timelines for the elimination of the most hazardous chemicals.

“We’re calling on all of these companies to become more transparent, and to provide clear timelines for the disclosure of pollution information, so that the public can quickly and easily monitor their progress towards zero discharges of all hazardous chemicals”, said Hojsik.

The inclusion of C&A and Li-Ning in the Joint Roadmap, and their accompanying ‘Detox’ commitments, will strengthen the already committed brands’ position when working with suppliers to revolutionize the way clothes are made and to introduce toxic-free production processes.

“As the first Chinese brand to commit to remove all hazardous chemicals from its supply chain and products and adopt the Joint Roadmap, Li-Ning are setting a clear precedent for all other Chinese brands to follow”, said Hojsik. “Toxic water pollution is an urgent problem for millions of people, so there’s plenty of work still to do for all of these brands, who must listen to their customers’ demands for toxic-free clothing, and move quickly and decisively to bring about effective and structural change in the fashion industry”, he concluded.